Building countries’ capacity to scale up nutrition by working with governments to reduce malnutrition

When countries reduce malnutrition, health of their populations can improve, which in turn can help improve educational outcomes, workforce productivity and national economic growth.

Countries that have signed up to the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement can now tap into the Micronutrient Initiative’s (MI) team of experts to improve country technical capacity to design, deliver and track the progress of multi-sectoral nutrition programs to help reduce widespread malnutrition.

MI’s Nutrition Technical Assistance Mechanism (N-TEAM) is a global hub of technical expertise who provide technical support to governments, particularly for the planning, research and delivery, as well as the tracking and surveillance of nutrition programs.

N-TEAM uses a country-driven, coordinated approach to ensure all partners committed to improving nutrition outcomes – whether they are donors, national governments, civil society or community groups – are connected and consulted, and that all systems for nutrition delivery are harmonized to achieve maximum impact.

MI is now accepting applications from experts from a variety of nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive fields, who are interested in helping Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) countries translate their global targets into concrete action.

Apply here: N-TEAM Technical Assistance Provider Recruitment Form

For more information, please contact: TechnicalAssistance@micronutrient.org

Supporting DFID’s Technical Assistant for Nutrition (TAN) Project

Through funding from the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID), N-TEAM will provide support and assistance to countries that have joined the SUN Movement as part of their efforts to improve the nutritional status of their populations – especially women and children.

The MI component of DFID’s Technical Assistance Project, MI-TAN, seeks to improve the capacity of SUN countries to design, plan, manage and monitor the delivery of multi-sectoral national nutrition plans, and to generate, learn from and adopt knowledge that works. This happens through direct technical assistance (TA) provision to SUN country focal points, and through short-term technical assistance to the SUN Movement Secretariat (SMS).

Current consulting opportunities:

Gender Specialist (MI TAN) – closes April 4

Technical Advisor (Indonesia) – closes March 30

Evaluation of technical assistance (MI-TAN countries) – closes March 28

 

 

MI-TAN countries

The following 20 countries will receive MI-TAN support over a five year period: Bangladesh, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Burkina Faso, DR Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia.

MI-TAN approach

A country’s technical assistance (TA) needs are identified and prioritized in collaboration with SUN country focal points and national governments. MI also works with SUN country focal points to ensure the type of TA to be provided is best suited to the the needs and circumstances identified, such as national or international, and short- or long-term technical assistance.

Key stakeholders are also part of the consultation process, to ensure hamonization and effectiveness of the assistance provided. This includes SUN donors, UN agencies, civil society and business networks, as well as other local and international agencies and TA providers.

MI-TAN focus

The main focus areas for technical assistance provided include policy, planning, research, delivery, and tracking and surveillance of multi-sectoral nutrition programs for improved coverage and reach.

Some examples of TA support:

  • Policy: development of evidence-informed policies, guidelines, regulations, standards or curricula.
  • Planning: development of nutrition strategies and costed national nutrition plans; development of rolling annual operational and commodity supply plans.
  • Delivery: management of program implementation and monitoring with a particular emphasis on nutrition specific interventions provided during the 1000 days window, the pre-school period (2-5 years of age), or to adolescent girls (10-19 years of age) or women throughout their reproductive years (15-49 years of age).
  • Problem solving: use of implementation or operations research to identify ways of overcoming barriers to scale up where appropriate.
  • Tracking progress: national surveillance and program monitoring systems; qualitative and quantitative metrics; population-based micronutrient surveys; assessment of coverage and adherence.
SUN Movement

Founded in 2010, the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement is founded on the principle that all people have a right to food and good nutrition. SUN aims to unite people—from governments, civil society, the United Nations, donors, businesses and researchers—in a collective effort to improve nutrition.

SUN countries are putting the right policies in place, collaborating with partners to implement programs with shared nutrition goals, and mobilizing resources to effectively scale up nutrition, with a core focus on empowering women.

FACT SHEET

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